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NATURAL SUBSTANCES
- COMMONLY-REPORTED METHODS OF APPLICATION -
or, Olde Tyme Voodoo Remedies for People in Unrestful Situations :-)

We at SPELLMAKER.COM are attempting to gather and display the procedures listed below for the sake of posterity and do not necessarily advocate their usage. The procedures had been attempts made in the past by those who have gone before us to control their destinies. They are not the final say-so in any magical application, nor are they necessarily recommended by Rev. Corfield, and we certainly have not determined to advocate their usage.

A few of these herbs and uses may be foreign to some collector's awareness. This is because New Orleans, being a port city, had many items delivered from all over the world, and some of them fell into the hands of Voodoo practitioners. The substances and methods of application are reported below for those persons and collectors who might have an historical or educational interest in them.

A WORD OF CAUTION:
If you, personally, plan to utilise any of the items or procedures below, please use common-sense, reasonable judgement, careful planning and calm deliberation. DO NOT consider using them if or when you are in a state of hysterical desperation. If, perchance, you actually do use any of these items, you then have recognized that you will be using them at your own peril and take knowing responsibility for your actions. We at The Voodoo Boutique® will accept no responsibility regarding your personal decisions regarding the application or misapplication of the procedures listed below. Under no circumstances does Rev. Samantha Corfield nor any member or facet of The Voodoo Boutique® recommend drinking, eating or otherwise take internally any of the substances below.

ACACIA
(Acacia senegal): This had been used for consecration, power, dedication, and blessing. The oil was thought good for anointing.

ADAM & EVE ROOT
(Orchis spp.): 1) For the binding together of couples, each carried the root of his or her partner; the gentleman carried eve and the lady carried adam. 2) To attract a new partner, one carried the root of one's gender preference. 3) To enhance one's personal magnetism among his or her peers, one carried the root of one's own gender.

ADDER'S TONGUE / ADDER'S MOUTH
(Ophioglossum vulgatum/Erythtonium americanum): To halt or prevent idle chatter and malicious gossip one spread it about the entrance to the tattle-tale's residence. Some was also gotten on her personal items if it were possible.

AGAR AGAR / SEA LETTUCE
(Gracilaria lichenoides): 1) One massaged the herb into the center of one's palms for luck just before he parted for gambling. 2) Ladies did the same particularly for bingo. 3) Some had carried this in a yellow cloth so that when playing they could seek for to win expeditiously.

ALFALFA
(Medicago sativa): For good fortune and prosperity, one spread a little around her house.

ALL HEAL / WOUNDWORT
(Prunella vulgaris): 1) It was said that this might bring calmness to the stressed, and produce relaxation in general. 2) This had been used for the gathering of finances, 3) protection from injury, and 4) togetherness among people and thus make new friends. The idea was to spread this herb around the room.

ALLSPICE
(Pimenta officinalis): 1) Some had used this to acquire determination and financial gain when they mixed it with arrowroot and kept the blend in a moneybag. 2) The house was fumed, by wives who wished a successful and happy household.

ALMOND
(Prunus amygdalus): 1) This had been used for to attract love from afar, and 2) might have helped one generally with good luck and finances.

ALOE
(Aloe vera): Romantics used to dab a little scent, ladies on the bosom and men at the neck, when they went questing for a new beau or coquette.

AMBERGRIS
(Spermaceti from Physeter/Catadon macrocephalus): This had been used for protection from misfortune and magic. It was used sparingly.

ANGELICA / HOLYGHOST ROOT
(Angelica sylvestris/A. archangelica/A. atropurpurea): 1) People did use this when they wished to cement relationships or draw friends, gain popularity or win companions. 2) This was also used when attempting to have a lost love be found or returned. 3) Longevity, health, 4) protect from magic, purification, and 5) stress relief had been variously reported. 6) Incense was used for to call a wandering beau. 7) Dutiful wives would spread this around the parlor and other chambers, and then place a little over thresholds and mantles to protect their homes.

ANISE
(Pimpinella anisum): This was for those with clairvoyant ability and the third eye leanings. It was taken as a tea to increase seeing ability and then burned as incense while viewing the sphere.

APPLE
(Pyrus malus): When a young lady desired contentment and a magnetic relationship, she enclosed her beau's name with hers in an apple and buried it in her back yard.

ARROWROOT
(Maranta arundinacea): Luck, good fortune and success had been attributed to this. One blended it with chamomile and agar agar, and then heavily fumigate the room.

ASAFOETIDA
(Ferula foetida): When defense was required, the sufferer scattered this among his bully's belongings, put it in his path, tossed a bit at his door and spread it along his walk.

ASH
(Fraxinus americanus/F. excelsior/Pyrus aucuparia): Fumigation with this was done for protection from magical harm.

ASTER
(Aster spp.): This was mixed into any potpourri for relief from stress.

BALM
(Melissa officinalis): A coquette concealed a bit of this in the contents of her beau's meal if a relationship with an intention toward love was desired.

BALM OF GILEAD / POPLAR
(Commiphora opobalsamum/Populus candicans/P. tremuloides): 1) Reputedly this had been used for to resolve relationship difficulties. 2) For protection, it was carried wrapped in a violet cloth.

BALMONY / SNAKEHEAD
(Chelone glabra): For those who sought revenge, this had been put with the bully's name in a black cloth, and then bound and buried at the foot of a grave.

BALSAMINE
(Impatiens balsamina): For purposes of attraction, a man bathed with this.

BASIL
(Ocimum basilicum/O. minimum): This was a bath for to alter one's fortune from ill to good.

BAY / LAUREL
(Laurus nobilis/Kalmia latifolia): This was reported to protect, cleanse and alter situations that one might attained completeness and happiness. Placed about the house, and carried bound in a handkerchief, it was.

BAYBERRY
(Myrica verifera): A pinch dropped upon a votary candle for finances and fortune was a special thing.

BEARBERRY / UVA URSI
(Arctostaphylos uva-ursi): For spirituality, a person fumigated weekly with this.

BENZOIN
(Styrax benzoin/Lindera spp.): This incense had been utilized for 1) to purify, protect from magic, and 3) to hold one's composure.

BERGAMOT
(Citrus bergamia/Monarda didyma): Censing for general completion of endeavors, general protection and successful conclusions was the basis for this herb's usage.

BETONY
(Betonica officinalis/B. aquatica/Stachys officinalis): A few persons said they used this to overpower crossings and for cleansings. They asperged with a blend of this herb and ginger, bloodroot and geranium.

BIRTHROOT
(Trillium pendulum): To gain shameless access to an unwanting or forbidden man, a young lady would mix this into his food.

BISTORT
(Polygonum bistortum): Good luck and money might have been found nearby if this were to be carried in a small amber cloth bundle.

BITTERSWEET
(Celastrus scandens/Solanum dulcamara): A) To drive an unruly neighbor from the quarter, an angry person might spread about his property. B) To drive such a person from the common house, it was spread about his room or before his door.

BLACK COHOSH
(Cimicifuga racemosa): For health and longevity, this had been used as a bath.

BLACK SNAKEROOT
(Sanicula marilandica): 1) For to improve one's standing in legal situations and court cases, this had been used as an oil. 2) For actions of love, as an incense. 3) For virility, a bath.

BLADDERWRACK
(Fucus vesiculosis): 1) When one wanted safety during travel, one carried this in green cloth. 2) For a pressing and stern bully-boy, it was tossed in his tracks and planted where he resided.

BLOODROOT / COONROOT
(Sanguinaria canadensis): To achieve relief from magical attack, one fumigated the residence.

BLUEBERRY
(Vaccinium myrtillus/Caulophyllum thalictroides): This might have caused mental stress to one's competitor by concealing a small amount in his belongings. It was then later spread across his path.

BLUE BONNET / CORNFLOWER
(Centaurea cyanus): One may use this for gaming, with the desire for success in mind.

BOLDINA / BOLDO
(Peumus boldus, Molina/Boldoa fragrans): A fine Chilean spice, it had been spread about to fend off destructive thoughts and emotions.

BONESET / AGUEWEED
(Eupatorium perfoliatum): 1) When a lady desired revenge for a wrong-doing, she would get some of this oil on the bully's things. A) She would also put a bit in an old tin can with his name and bury it. 2) For protection, she burned it as incense.

BROOM
(Orobanche major/Cytisus scoparius): To remove strife, a young wife would spread this about her kitchen and remain there until her husband recovered from his anger.

BUCHU
(Barosma betulina): Prognostication was supposed to be easy after the seer rubbed this on his temples and bregma.

BULLSACK
(genus Bos): This was carried by the serious strutting hazarder who would keep the money for his last play in it. It also contained his prize fetishes.

CALAMUS / SWEET FLAG
(Acorus calamus): To gain approval through inducement, persuasion, a person spread this about the room, then chewed a pinch prior to the expected incident.

CAMPHOR
(Cinnamomum camphora): 1) This may have represented hasteness and security in some situations. 2) For dreaming, a blend of dandelion, thyme and mimosa incense was used.

CARAWAY
(Carum carvi): 1) For safety this was carried bound in red cloth. 2) For love, it was ground and mixed into her beau's picnic sandwich.

CARDAMOM
(Elettaria cardamomum/Amomum cardamomum): Hoping to bring on swooning passion in a young lady, men would carry this in a scarlet cloth.

CARNATION
(Dianthus spp.): A lady wore this perfume to enhance her appearance and lure good fortune when around men.

CASCARA SAGRADA / BUCKTHORN
(Rhamnus purshiana/R. californica): 1) Before court cases or legal affairs, this was secretly spread about the courtroom. 2) To focus and fulfill one's desires, it was spread about the house.

CASHEW NUT / CAJUEIRO
(Anacardium occidentale): 1) This oil had been applied when one desired situations of love, and 2) it had been used as a general tonic, especially when imbibed as a tea.

CATNIP
(Nepeta spp./N. cataria): This had been used to intensify personal power and to magnetically draw love into one's sphere of activity. A naughty girl placed this about the corners in her room.

CATUABA
(Juniperus brasiliensis): Some roues used this for virility enhancement and as a men's tonic for fatigue.

CAYENNE / AFRICAN PEPPER / BIRD PEPPER
(Capsicum frutescens v. longum): This had been used to cause great confusion to one's competitors. It was tossed on the person's front door and banquette.

CEDAR
(Cedrus spp./Thuja occidentalis): 1) Just the chips have been used to expand thoughts and 2) project emotions. 3) It was also considered good for contentment and 4) general good luck.

CHAMOMILE / MANZANILLA
(Anthemis nobilis/Matricaria chamomilla): Thought to increase 1) passion, luck in gaming, and general attraction, one washed his hands and face before going out at night.

CHERRY
(Prunus cerasus/P. avium): 1) This scent was used when contentment, relaxation and jocularity were desired. 2) Cherries were used now and then to bring on passionate circumstances.

CHEWING JOHN
(Alpinia galangal): Used by those who were besieged with legal affairs and court cases, and to return jinxes, they chewed it, then tossed it behind their backs while walking toward the place representing their unhappy situation. They were advised to not look back when doing this.

CHICORY
(Cichorium intybus): Some would press back a competitor by burning this with a black figure candle.

CHOCOLATE
(Theobroma cacao seeds): Supposedly softened the heart and eased tension when fed to an angry lover. "Aunt Matilda used to put us to bed at night with jus' a little piece o' chocolate, an' we slep' well all night long."

CINCHONA
(Cinchona succirubra/Cortex cinchonae/C. chinae/Rubiaceae): Supposed to have been intensely stimulating and released the libido.

CINNAMON
(Cinnamomum zeylanicum): To acquire 1) fortune, finances, 2) , or 3) promptness in responses, a man concealed this in others' food.

CINQUEFOIL / FIVE FINGER GRASS
(Potentilla spp.): When one could take no more bullying, one would put down the troublesome person by spreading this as a liquid over his front door and entranceway. It was also placed next to his skin, if possible.

CITRONELLA
(Andropogon nardus/Cymbopogon nardus): This has been used to assist people to come and enter one's establishment.

CIVIT
(Nandinia spp./N. binotata): This was a cat musk used in perfumeries. 1) It apparently moisturized and soothed the skin. 2) It was considered a mood enhancer. 3) One touched a dab in her private places for attracting passion.

CLOVE
(Caryophyllus aromaticus/Sysygium aromaticum/Eugenia caryophyllata): Women of questionable virtue fumigated their rooms before 1) sexual matters and 2) spiritual contact, after blending this with camphor. 3) It was considered "good" for Ouija®.

CLOVER / TREFOIL
(Trifolium spp.): 1) This represented loyalty, faithfulness and assurance to the romantic. 2) To fend off magical attacks, it was mixed with high john, vervain and dill. The area was then censed.

COCONUT
(Cocos nucifera): This was considered for quick and fortuitous good luck.

COCKLEBURR / AGRIMONY
(Agrimonia eupatoria): Incense was applied for to return harmful magic to it's precipitator.

COFFEE
(Coffea arabica/Coffea spp.): Apparently this hastened bodily repair when used in the bath.

COMFREY
(Symphytum officinale): For protection during travel, some carried this in a small indigo cloth bundle.

CORIANDER
(Coriandrum sativum): Women of light virtue were supposedly advised that for volatile love this had to be secreted in men's food.

CORNFLOWER
(Lychnis githago/Centaurea cyanus): To bring on a sense of calmness, wives incensed the rooms.

COWSLIP
(Primula veris/Caltha palustris): To keep unwanted visitors out of the house, this was placed on the steps leading up to the porch.

CUCUMBER
(Cucumis sativus): It had been said that this soothes and calmes the spirit.

CUMIN
(Cuminum cyminum): Some people indicate that for long-lasting love this was mixed into the desired one's food.

CURRY
(A spice mixedure.): This spice, when burned, was believed to stave off the negative.

CYPRESS
(Taxodium distichum/Cupressus spp.): It was claimed that fumigation relieved despair and distress.

DAHLIA
(Dahlia variabilis): Once symbolized fortitude and survival. It was worn as a cologne.

DAISY
(Bellis spp./Chrysanthemum leucanthemum): For healing and restoration, a bouquet was put near the infirm, who, it was reported, after a short time seemed refreshed.

DAMIANA
(Turnera aphrodisiaca): Supposedly stimulates and brings on romantic interest. It has been suggested that this was accomplished by blending into a person's food.

DANDELION
(Taraxacum officinale/Leontodo taraxacum): When attempting to bring on clairvoyance and success one carried this in a blue cloth.

DEVIL'S SHOESTRING
(Viburnum spp.): For luck when 1) gaming, and for 2) protection, this was carried in a red cloth bundle.

DILL
(Anethum graveolens): This had been used to 1) confound competition, 2) bring love, and 3) remove a crossed condition. White women who desired those conditions drank it as tea.

DITTANY / FRAXINELLA
(Dictamnus albus/Dectamnus albus): A bath was done for to 1) gain popularity, for 2) goal achievement, and for 3) spirituality.

DOG GRASS / COUCH GRASS / TWITCH GRASS
(Agropyron repens/Cynodon dactylon/Triticum repens): This had been used to 1) restrain a troublemaker, 2) return magic, and to 3) acquire a lover. 4) It was spread about another's property to prevent their happiness, especially upon their grass.

DOGWOOD
(Cornus florida/Piscidia spp.): This was said to defend against bad things. It was burned outside a person's perimeters.

ELDER / ELDERBERRY
(Sambucus nigra/S. spp.): 1) To reduce the impact of one's problems this had been put in the corners of rooms. 2) The oil was used for consecration, and for 3) love. 4) Incense was for protection. 5) To make a competitor leave or stay away, it was put near the entrance to his residence or in his yard.

ELECAMPANE
(Inula helenium): For love and attraction, this was burned with mistletoe and vervain.

EUCALYPTUS
(Eucalyptus spp.): 1) To fortify one's health they bathed with it, and 2) to eliminate distressful dreams, people put this in a white kerchief under the pillow.

FENNEL
(Foeniculum vulgare/Arethum foeciculum): 1) Used for love and to 2) fend off magic, believers carried some in a small kerchief to 3) prevent ill events and 4) bring fortune their way.

FLAX
(Linum spp./L. usitatissimum/Linaria vulgaris): Foreknowledge. Used as a bath and in tea to enhance the psychic abilities, especially of the readers of playing cards.

FLEUR-DE-LIS / IRIS / BLUE FLAG
(Iris versicolor/I. pseudacorus): Perfume once used for success, attraction and profit; it was further blended with coconut, cinnamon and nutmeg by some.

FUMITORY
(Fumaria officinalis): For rapid financial transactions that might end to one's advantage, the feet and shoes were washed with this.

GALANGAL
(Alpinia galanga/Hypericum perforatum): For legal affairs one might have used this incense for one fortnight before taking the ashes in a purple cloth to court. It was then secretly spread around the area.

GARDENIA
(Gardenia spp.): Had been used for to slow down troublemakers' activities.

GARLIC
(Allium sativum/A. ampeloprasum): One might have prevented envy and competitive magic by spreading this around the entrances to one's home and around one's work post.

GENTIAN ROOT
(Gentiana lutea/Swertia perennis): Bathing with this was done for spiritual constancy.

GERANIUM
(Pelargonium spp.): Faded glory. This incense was reported to have stopped competitive magic.

GINGER / AFRICAN GINGER
(Zingiber officinale): Passion. 1) To get an unsavory person out of a lady's room, this was applied quickly, behind his back, to his clothing. 2) To protect one's self from bad spirits, jinxes and crossings it was spread around the floor of the house.

GRAINS OF PARADISE
(Amomum spp./Ampelopsis spp.): This was said to have been used for spirituality, success, and fortification. On the wall opposite the front door, was placed a lithograph of St. Peter, opposite the back door, one of St. Michael. The seriously religious would attach a small paper packet containing the herb to the back of each saint.

GRAPE
(Vitis spp./Berberis aquifolium): This was considered to attract both 1) popularity and 2) finances. A bowl of them was kept in the parlor. The lady sipped wine and drank a cup of fresh grape juice each day. Certain young women of color placed one fresh grape under their tignon's before leaving for the quadroon ball.

GROUND IVY / CAT'S PAW/GILL
(Glechoma hederacea/Nepeta hederacea): Attraction. Sincerity, love. It was considered that one should just have a bunch of this around the day room and the porch to give an aire of serenity.

GUINEA PEPPER
(Capsicum annum): For nasty people: To give them confusion, anger, and extreme distress, in other words to make them mental, this was spread upon their property and about the entrances of their homes. Some was, with a black paper with their names upon it, stuffed inside a squash with three black peppercorns. The squash was left beside an anthill.

HAWTHORNE
(Crataegus oxycantha/Mespilus oxycantha): This had been used by some women as a floor and wall wash to get rid of negativity and to cleanse the house.

HEATHER
(Calluna vulgaris): To retain and always have money, it was said that some people put a small amount of this herb in their billfold or clutch.

HEMLOCK
(Conium maculatum): Arguments were supposed to have been caused by getting some of this between the couple or in their kitchen and parlor.

HIBISCUS
(Hibiscus spp.): To touch their ajna and temples for inspiration, some people had been informed.

HIGH JOHN THE CONQUEROR / MANROOT / ST. JOHN'S ROOT
(Convulvulus spp./Hypercum perforatum): For good luck with 1) finances and 2) love, this was carried. Some young men carried it for to control their sweethearts. 3) To ward off magic attacks and negativity, it had been hung over doors and windows. Hypercum was considered second best to Convulvulus. "Uncle Jack never went out without his High John bag in a pocket."

HOLLYBERRY
(Ilex spp.): For a lady who wished to control her male visitor, she kept a little near him.

HOLLYHOCK
(Althaea rosea): 1) Some salesmen bathed with this hoping to gain ambition and finances. 2) The incense was used for spirituality.

HOLY THISTLE / BLESSED THISTLE
(Carduus marianus/Cnicus benedictus/Carbenia benedicta): Many people have used this for 1) spirituality and to 2) remove dark thoughts by spreading it about their rooms.

HONEY
(substance in hive of Apis mellifica): Very seductive and sensual, this is. It has been taken with peaches for to restore the nature masculine.

HONEYSUCKLE
(Lonicera spp./Lonicor caprifolium): This scent has been reported as good for learning and studing. The temples were anointed, as well as inside the cusps of the ears in order to recall things.

HOREHOUND
(Marrubium vulgare): Small bags of this was placed on windowsills and at thresholds to keep bad influences away.

HYACINTH
(Hyacinthus spp.): It had been said that a darky should wash with this if he wished to attract a white woman's love. "It was the master's bane, 'cause my grandaddy had his woman. (big smile)"

HYSSOP
(Hyssopus officinalis): For purification of any space or object, this was stirred into the wash water. Sacred items were touched with this oil. It has been said to have kept things of the negative pole away. People bathed with this and steamed the house room by room to achieve purity.

IRISH MOSS
(Chondrus crispus): 1) A shopkeeper or storekeeper might spread this on his floor and before the front door to increase sales. 2) Door-to-door salesmen carried this along with a shamrock all bound in a small green silk cloth.

IRONWEED
(Vernonia fasciculata): When attempting to gain power over authorities, superiors and peers, some persons carried this in a violet cloth and held it tightly when entering a confrontation.

JAMAICAN GINGER
(West Indies white ginger): For the red: Before gambling, this was used in a bath. Then during actual gaming it was carried concealed in a small red envelope in a pocket.

JASMINE
(Jasminum officinale): To entrance one's beau, a young lady bathed with this, used the perfume, secretly dropped a few pinches into his pockets, and sprinkled where he would sit, for his love and fidelity.

JEZEBEL ROOT
(Iris spp.): To jinx another suitor for the same girl, a rake might have concealed a small container holding the root and three rusty nails by the man's front door and near his place of employment.

JOB'S TEARS
(Coix lacryma-jobi): 1) For a successful endeavor, women would put seven tears in an orange cotton cloth, wrap them thrice, and carry them until satisfied. Then she would bury them. 2) A lady also did this to bring her man back by putting his name with them.

JUNIPER
(Juniperus communis): Some have asserted that for success and fortunate circumstances, people at one time used an oil made from the berries as a perfume or cologne.

KAVA / KAVA KAVA
(Macropiper latifolium/Piper methysticum): 1) This was carried in white cloth for protection while traveling and to prevent accidents. 2) It may also have been carried in red cloth for successful endeavors.

KORIBO
(Tanaecium nocturnum): It had been posited that to induce love one made a tea.

KNOTWEED / HEARTEASE / BIRDSEYE
(Polygonum spp./Viola tricolor): To remove a very bad bully, one put this in a black cloth with his name on it and nailed it to a tree in a public park. With each of three strikes of the mallet he would say, "You be gone."

LADY THUMB
(Polygonum persicaria): A) A young woman might have written her beau's name on paper, sprinkled a little of this upon it, then nicely wrapped it up in red tissue and put the package under her pillow. By doing so she hoped to draw him to her. B) A rakish kind of woman might put it in her undergarments.

LAVENDER
(Lavendula vera/L. officinalis): This was used to promote 1) love, 2) money, 3) calmness. Ladies would add some to their bath water, sprinkle a bit in each corner of the sitting parlor, and burn a touch of incense near the foyer before their suitors would arrive.

LEATHER
(Tanned epidermis): Psalm 146 was read over an item of leather clothing, it was then 1) worn to draw friendship or 2) placed beside or worn by an ill person.

LEMON
(Citrus limonum): 1) Some claim that this had been useful for spiritual protection, cleansing, purification. 2) Others said it was used to turn neutral events into fortunate circumstances.

LEMON VERBENA
(Lippia citriordora/Aloysia triphylla): 1) To bring an unhappy couple together, this was mixed with cinnamon and passed lightly around their home, and expecially in their chamber. A small paper packet of it was placed upon a tintype of them. 2) To separate a couple, this was mixed with a finely diced guinea pepper with black peppercorns and was spread around inside and outside their residence. A small paper packet of it was placed upon a tintype of them.

LEMONGRASS
(Andropogon schaenanthus): 1) To stabilize one's spirit, for calmness and to remove jinxes, one might have bathed with this before fumigatingd her residence. 2) A seer would anoint her scrying items with this once a month.

LICORICE
(Glycyrrhiza glabra): 1) The spreading of this behind one's beau as he left was avowed to bring him back. 2) She would then wash his linge with just a wee bit to keep him faithful.

LIFE EVERLASTING
(Gnaphalium spp./Antennaria margaritaceum): Some thought that this tea would prolong a life.

LILAC
(Syringa spp.): Ladies dabbed this at the base of their necks for 1) vivid recall and to 2) increase longevity. They stated that it was used to stave off the ravages of time.

LILY
(Lilium spp./Convalearia majalis/Nymphaea): This signified purity. Cool lily water on the forehead was touted to relieve a fitful mind.

LIME
(Citrus aurantifolia): When one wished to help her beau remain faithful, she would blend just a touch of this with angelica and cense her rooms every few days.

LINDEN
(Tilia spp.): A lady might have put a drop of this on her lips and throat each night to keep her lover close.

LINSEED / FLAX
(Linum usitatissimum): This incense had been used in a darkened room for divination.

LOTUS
(Nymphaea spp.): Wantons and players at chance, to obtain a man's money they carried this in a gray, green or maroon cloth.

LOVAGE
(Levisticum officinale): When either fate or bad decisions might bring a subpoena to a person, he took a bath with this the day of the case, and then carried some in a small purple parcel into the courtroom.

LUCKY HAND ROOT
(Dactylorhyza spp.): When sporting, certain men of color would carry this with a dollar bill and three pennies bound in red cloth.

MACE
(Nutmeg tree, Myristica fragrans): This was used in the cuisine to A) bring people together after an arguement, and to B) increase desire.

MAGNOLIA
(Magnolia glauca): This for many signified beauty in all things. 1) Aspiring prophets would massage their temples and foreheads for psychic sight and then sit before their darkened mirrors. 2) The lady of the house, to keep her lover at home, placed some under her lover's pillow.

MAIDEN HAIR
(Adiantum pedatum/A. capillus veneris): Those who carried this fern were attempting to attract love and other good things.

MANDRAKE / MANDRAGORA
(Podophyllum petatum/Mandragora officinarum/Attropa mandragora): 1) Those who sought love carried this concealed in red cloth. 2) When preparing to dominate another, this incense was burned by the salesman.

MARIGOLD / CALENDULA
(Calendula officinalis): A young lady might have bathed with this and concealed just a wee bit in her bonnet for love attraction.

MARJORAM
(Origanum vulgare/Majorana hortensis): 1) Use in bath if sorrowful or lonely. 2) Spread around the house to fend off magic.

MARSHMALLOW
(Althaea officinalis): For certain persons, this signified intense love. It was placed around the altar for spiritual contact, and burned as incense.

MELON
(Squash family): A) This was thought to increase virility in men, passion in women, and B) strength and energy in both.

MESQUITE
(Prosopis spp.): 1) Used for purification, it was put in washes and baths. 2) Rooms were heavily smoked prior to divination by dark ladies of indian extraction.

MIMOSA
(Acacia baileyana/Albizia julibrissin): Some people of a secretive nature would dab a little of this on their temples, forehead and beside their nostrils for prophetic dreams.

MISTLETOE
(Phoradendron flavescens/Viscum album): This was, by some, considered to be symbolic of attraction. This was spread around wherever one wished people to come, and friendship or more it was hoped would occur.

MORNING GLORY
(Ipomoea spp.): A) It might have been that a few people placed this near doorways for protection of their houses, B) for certain it was that some carried it in a small yellow cloth in their pockets.

MOTHERWORT
(Leonurus cardiaca): For protection this was kept near the family tintypes.

MOUNTAIN GRAPE / OREGON GRAPE ROOT
(Mahonia aquifollium): Attraction. 1) When one desired to discover sources for financial means one carried this in green or gold cloth. 2) For love or drawing people, it was contained in a red cloth.

MUGWORT / CINGULUM
(Artemisia vulgaris/A. franserioides): 1) For apparitions, incense was burned near the crystal orb. 2) When love was desired, one bathed with this.

MULLIEN
(Verbascum spp./V. thapsus/Solidago spp.): 1) Some athletes burned this against hardy competition. 2) Others burned this when vying for a new position at the factory.

MUSK ROOT / SUMBUL
(Hibiscus abelmochus/Ferula sumbul): A) Hostel ladies wore the perfume, and B) sporting men carried the root in red flannel, for attraction and to engender passion.

MUSTARD
(Brassica nigra/B. hirta/Cruciferae): 1) When competition grew heated, one spread black seed on his opponent's property to confuse him. 2) Wives would spread the red seed outside the various entrances to their homes to keep unfortunate people out. 3) A wandering jack-of-trades would now and then carry some yellow seed in a green bag for success in obtaining jobs.

MYRRH
(Commiphora myrrha): A dutiful businessman might have used this incense to cleanse the store, defend against competitors, and succeed in sales.

MYRTLE
(Myrtus communis): 1) Supposedly this was an excellent bath for the acquisition of love, luck or money. 2) The incense was for clarity of mind.

NARCISSUS
(Narcissus spp./Amaryllidaceae): A little was placed under one's pillow for restful nights. "Pauline, she say that's how she kep' her man asleep while she fool' around outside with the neighbor at night."

NETTLES
(Urtica spp./U. dioica): If necessary, some was spread about corners of rooms to drive off magical oppression.

NUTMEG
(Myristica fragrans): 1) This was mixed with a wash when a lady wished for fortunate circumstances and hoped to prevent bad luck. 2) When playing the cards, some sporting men carried in red cloth the nut, containing a drop of mercury, sealed by wax, in a small metal box.

OAK / KING OF THE FOREST
(Quercus spp./Q. robur): This signified strength to some persons. The incense was used to chase away all negativity.

OLIBANUM / FRANKINCENSE
(Boswellia spp./B. thurifera): Success. This was considered a powerful anointing oil. Incense was burned for spiritual purposes.

OLIVE
(Olea europaea): This was a very special oil used for deeply religious purposes such as consecration, blessing, dedication, etc.

ORANGE
(Citrus aurantium/C. sinensis): Attraction, love. One touched any contractual agreement with this oil to assure it was sealed and would be completed. "Them toothless whities marveled how good our teeth look'--we pick'd 'em with orange tree twigs."

OREGANO
(Origanum vulgare): Vagabonds would spread this around the entrances to their temporary abodes to keep thieves and killers out.

ORCHID
(Family Orchidacae): This was believed to be a mental incense, used for concentration, memory and recall.

ORRIS ROOT
(Iris florentina/I. pseudocorus): Some ladies used this for love, attraction, and friendship. They would endeavor to get some on the clothes of the one in whom they had an interest. They carried this root in a red silk kerchief.

PALO AZUL
(Aemotoxylon Campechanum L./Calatola costaricensis Standl./Eysenhardtia polystachya): It was thought that this could bring good luck to the unfortunate. Those in the lower strata of society carried this to improve their standing.

PALO SANTO
(Bursera Graveolens/Bulnesia Samienti Lor.): A) Better ladies of Spanish extraction used this as a wash to weaken crossings. B) To remove the darkness from corners they would heavily incense the rooms, then whisk the smoke out the windows.

PAPAYA
(Carica papaya): This was considered to change misfortune to success. Mixed with mandrake, one would first incense the house, then bathe, dress, and sit outside with the windows and doors open while chatting with her neighbors.

PARSLEY
(Petroselinum sativum/Carum petroselinum): For attraction girls blended this with jasmine and bound it all in a small red cloth which was worn pinned to the inside of their skirts.

PASSION FLOWER
(Passiflora incarnata): 1) For calmness and clarity of purpose, ladies of good manner used this as incense. 2) For attraction, single women would use it as a wash or bath.

PATCHOULY
(Pogostemon patchouli): Sporting men carried this and painted ladies wore it in the belief that it would help draw 1) money (some dabbed it inside their billfolds) and 2) love (it was a very heady and potent perfume).

PEACH TREE
(Prunus persica): 1) Many used twigs as incense for calmness, peace of mind, and concentration. 2) Others thought this nectar was an element necessary to living a very long life.

PENNYROYAL
(Hedeoma pulegioides/Mentha pulegium): 1) This had been spread around interiors to chase away bad thoughts and 2) to change poor luck to good. 3) The scent was supposed to prevent travel sickness, but ginger might have been better.

PEONY
(Paeonia officinalis): 1) The root was used as a lucky charm when kept in a cloth with three shamrocks. 2) It was used to fend off bad things when kept in a white cloth with a very small knife. If a person had both, the lucky one was in the left pocket, the other in the right.

PEPPER TREE
(Schinus molle): Used by some as an incense, others as a floor wash. In either case the person also bathed with it to clear away negative feelings and thoughts.

PEPPERCORNS
(Piper nigrum): A woman of a certain house had spread this about her competitor's living quarters so that she would receive the other's male clients. "Chere, my momma near drove her outa business."

PEPPERMINT
(Mentha piperita): Some placed this under their beds with camphor for interesting dreams.

PERIWINKLE
(Vinca major/V. minor/Apocynaceae): The oil and incense had been used for the attraction of girls by a certain breed of young men.

PETUNIA
(Petunia spp.): This oil was believed to increase one's chances of acquiring financial backing. A lady might have her milliner conceal a little of this inside the sweat band of her new hat.

PINE
(Pinus spp./Pinaceae): 1) Certain men used this oil to increase virility and the male nature. 2) The incense was burned to chase away bad thoughts and purify a single male's residence. 3) Some men bathed with this to eliminate destructive thoughts while 4) others bathed for successful completion of any financial endeavor.

PINEAPPLE
(Ananas sativus/Bromelia pinguin): Women bereft thought this would assist in drawing their wandering man back. Some might have put their request under a red candle that has been rubbed with the pulp.

PLANTAIN
(Plantago spp./P. major): It was believed that one could chase off competitors by keeping slices of this around.

POKEWEED
(Phytolacca americana/P. decandra): Baths were sometimes taken to cure bad luck.

POPPY
(Papaver somniferum/P. rhoeas): This signifies forgetfulness. Women put a bit under their pillows if they had difficulty falling asleep.

POTENCY WOOD / LIRIOSMA / MUIRA PUAMA
(Ptychopetalum uncinatum/P. olacoides): 1) Considered an aphrodisiac, this was used for to induce love. 2) It was also used to increase a man's virility.

PRIMROSE
(Primula officinalis/P. vulgaris): Calming, some might have spoken regarding this. For an unruly child, it was put in a pillow and his bath water.

QUASSIA
(Picraena excelsa): A romantic young lady might put some in her locket with a ring of her hair and her lover's hair.

QUEEN OF THE MEADOW / JOE-PYE WEED /
TRUMPET WEED / GRAVELROOT

(Eupatorium purpureum): 1) Some seers would bathe with this to see their futures, but not their deaths. 2) A single man might have carried this in blue cloth for personal attraction. 3) Unemployed men carried it in green silk for financial attraction or work. 4) For virility, a man's wife would blushingly wash his erect male organ with it.

QUEEN'S DELIGHT / QUEENSROOT
(Stillingia sylvatica): This was considered an excellent bath for gaining a pregnancy or a marriage.

QUINCE
(Cydonia vulgaris/Pyrus cydonia): The oil and incense had been utilized for the bringing of a contented love, purity and clarity of purpose.

RAGWEED
(Ambrosia trifida/A. artemisiaefolia L./Senecio vulgaris): This was believed to be aphrodisiacal, and some bathed with it.

RASPBERRY
(Rubus strigosus/R. idaeus): This had been used as a bath for the acquisition of intense passion and fertility by many young women.

RATTLESNAKE ROOT
(Goodyera pubescens): This was considered as a protectant from physical harm, and was carried with a small gold ladder in purple cloth.

ROSE
(Rosa spp./Rosaceae): Some lighter-skinned women, octaroon to white, anointed themselves with hopes of finding affection. 1) A hopeful young lady put the petals into a silver box with her beau's tintype for to bring them together, and later put her own portrait there to keep them together. Red thread was put in as a symbol of their being bound together. She might have carried her beau's name with the petals in a red silk cloth to bring him near. Roses were concealed carefully around the room before her visitor was to come. A white lady bathed in roses and milk for attraction.

ROSEMARY
(Rosmarinus officinalis): 1) Some girls burned this incense to ease their yearning hearts. B) A girl might have petitioned her beau to put this under his pillow to keep thoughts of her with him. 2) The incense was used to drive unfortunate spirits from the room.

RUE
(Ruta graveolens): 1) The lonely sometimes bathed with this and used the oil for attraction, attention and finding love. 2) A house was censed for protection from magical intent.

SAFFLOWER / MEXICAN SAFFRON
(Carthamus tinctorius): 1) Naughty young ladies dabbed this inside their thighs to induce passion in any lover, be it male or female. 2) This was wrap't in a black cloth and concealed on one's competitor's property, while the oil was applied to his belongings. A) It was used with bittersweet, as incense against competitor.

SAFFRON
(Crocus sativus): This had been considered a bath for inducement of love or for to seduce a marriage proposal.

SAGE
(Salvia spp./S. officinalis): A) A certain mulatto woman during the early nineteenth century learned from the indians to apply this oil to her temples and third eye while viewing her orb. B) She also used the incense for cleansing and to disperse phantoms from the room.

SAMPSON SNAKEROOT
(Echinacea spp.): 1) Some rakes carried this along with magnetite in a red cloth close to their groins for virility. A) The bath, it was explained, would restore one's nature. 2) It was burned as incense with the intention of acquiring quick, but temporary, passionate love.

SANDALWOOD
(Santalum album): Ladies of a curious nature wore this at their ears and temples for 1) clairvoyance, navel and abdomen for 2) health, and armpits and loins for 3) love. 4) They also burned their written wishes in this incense.

SARSAPARILLA
(Smilax officinalis): Men applied this to their groins for virility, longevity, passion. Root beer.

SASSAFRAS
(Sassafras albidum/S. officinale): 1) To prolong a lady's downtown spending, she would keep it near her money. 2) It had been said that this was good for legalities and for court. 3) If one were to be on trial then one would have an accomplice clandestinely spread it about the courtroom.

SAW PALMETTO
(Serenoa serrulata): 1) For virility men drank a bit of this with sarsaparilla and a little damiana. 2) To permanently destroy a man's nature a vengeful woman would twice a day feed him a tablespoon or more of this.

SEA WRACK
(Wrack consisted of the natural undersea plants [plankton, kelp, seaweed, etc.] that had been deposited along any beach at the high tide line.): This was used against any kind of competitor.

SENNA
(Cassia marilandica/C. acutifolia): 1) To attract a coquette, a willful boy carried this in a gold cloth with azalea, balsamine, a cat's claw, and her name. 2) To ensure loyalty, he sought to have her bathe with it.

SKULLCAP / SCULLCAP
(Scutellaria lateriflora): 1) A questioning wife might have put this under her husband's bed with 2 lodestones in white cloth so he would think only of her. 2) To slow down a rival, a lady might spread this in her footprints. A) If the situation were serious, she would put her rival's name in sack cloth with this and black pepper, press twelve hat pins through it, then deposit it in the Mississippi river while saying nine times, "Depart now!"

SLIPPERY ELM
(Ulmus fulva): To stop idle chatter and prevent stray talk, a woman was advised to put this in a brown cloth with the names of the gossipers. She pierced it with three rusty nails each day for three days and then burned the packet and marked an X on sole of each of her shoes with the ashes. She then tossed the bag of ashes into the yard of the one who lead the talk.

SOLOMON'S SEAL
(Polygonatum spp./P. multiflorum): 1) Some carried this in red silk for success and protection. 2) Others burned it while studying and before taking a test.

SOUTHERNWOOD
(Artemisia abronatum): It had been said that this incense would work for 1) love or to 2) chase away unfortunate persons.

SPANISH MOSS
(Tillandsia usneoides): It had been determined by certain persons who gathered in dark rooms that this could be used to acquire 1) calmness, patience, 2) magical love or 3) dire vengeance.

SPEARMINT
(Mentha spicata): For purification and protection, it has been indicated that one might spread this about his entrances to prevent burglaries.

SPIKENARD
(Aralia spp./A. racemosa/Inula conyza): 1) Some used this to anoint sacred items and cleanse an area. 2) A desperate wife might have kept this with her husband's measurements in a jar in kitchen cabinet while hoping that he would quit his straying ways.

SQUAW VINE
(Mitchella repens): This was considered to be a bath for pregnant women, to protect the coming child.

SQUILL
(Scilla maritima/Urginea scilla): To increase money, this was put in a jar with one of each denomination of coin and folding money.

STAR ANISE
(Illicium spp.): 1) A femme sang-melee bathed then anointed her temples and forehead for seeing with crystal orb. 2) She carried it in a gold cloth for luck. 3) Unspoken-for ladies used this as an incense to draw the attention of men. 4) A girl wrapped it in red tissue for to turn her beau to want to be with her.

SULPHUR (SULFUR) / BRIMSTONE
(S, sp. gr. 2.07, atomic weight 32.06): This was blended with any competition-dispelling herb.

STRAWBERRY
(Fragaria virginiana): 1) It had been believed that this was good for attraction. 2) The oil was sometimes used with the hopes of turning an unfortunate event to lucky.

SWEET GRASS / CALAMUS / SWEET FLAG
(Acorus calamus): This had been used with the intention of reducing a party's state of distress due to loss of a loved one.

SWEET PEA
(Lathyrus spp.): Some people considered this to be good for attraction, friendship, and fidelity. They would apply it to the pit of their throats.

TANGERINE
(Citrus reticulata var. blanco): This was used as an incense additive that some believed vivified their magical work.

TANSY
(Tanacetum vulgare): 1) Some used that as a bath for protection from legal authorities such as process servers and policemen. 2) Those who lived a life of shame would put some inside their shoes and then cross the soles to escape from police. "Grandaddy tell tha's why he was never in jail, even though he was innocent when they come."

TARRAGON
(Artemisia dracunculus): An angry wife would spread this over a candle named after her man and then burn it at the sixth nightly hour to cause him difficulty.

THYME / GARDEN THYME
(Thymus vulgaris/T. serpyllum): 1) To stay in the luck and money, a man who engaged in chance might have bathed with this and spread it around the places he frequented. 2) People of another sort considered this to be good for dreams and spirituality.

TONKA BEAN
(Dipteryx odorata): This was touted as to bring very good luck. 1) Those in need carried seven of them for seven days, starting Monday, and each Sunday drop them in the church poor box. They did this until their prayers were answered. 2) People who desired good health carried nine bound in a small yellow packet wrapped with gold thread for long life.

TORMENTIL
(Tormentilla erecta/Potentilla tormentilla): 1) A person daily bathed with this if crossed, until the condition was reversed. 2) One drank the tea if it had been discovered that one's food had been treated magically. 3) One would get this one one's competitor's clothing, or better, inside the clothing, if it were possible.

TULIP
(Tulipa spp.): For protection against physical danger, such as accidents or attack by robbers, a man carried this in yellow cloth, while a lady carried it in pink.

UNICORN ROOT
(Chamaelirium luteum/C. carolinianum/Aletris farinosa): For virility and love, a coquette concealed this in her beau's clothing. A man would keep it near his privates. For the loyalty of a lover, two of these were bound together.

VALERIAN / HELIOTROPE / AMANTILLA
(Valeriana officinalis/V. hortensa): This was kept about the parlor for to protect a person's 1) health, 2) love and 3) money. 4) An area was fumigated to reduce tension between people.

VANILLA
(Vanilla planifolia): It had been said that one could blend this oil with roses for 1) love, 2) contentment, 3) spirituality and 4) success.

VERVAIN / VERBENA
(Verbena officinalis/V. hastata): For 1) love, 2) finances, or 3) knowledge, it was said that a lady bathed with this and sandalwood.

VETIVER / KHUS-KHUS
(Vetiveria zizanioides): For to dispel another reader's magical attacks, a woman would take a batch of this and split it in two. She spread half around her competitor's place of business. She would then take the other half and put it in her own cash drawer to draw money. The intent was to take her competitor's clients, also.

VIOLET
(Viola odorata/V. papilionacea): This had been used as a bath for 1) healing and for 2) peace, 3) love, 4) contentment.

VIRGINIA SNAKEROOT
(Aristolochia serpentaria): This was carried in purple cloth for good luck.

WATERMELON
(Cucurbita sativus/Citrullus vulgaris): This was used as an additive that increased any herbal effect.

WAHOO
(Euonymus atropurpureus): To cleanse an area and to ward off magic, a person might dust the corners of her rooms with this.

WILD YAM / DEVIL'S BONE
(Dioscorea villosa): 1) For purposes of vigorous health, a lady would carry this in a red cloth. 2) While doing so, she might have found that men showed an interest in her. 3) Men carried this in an attempt to attract healthy young ladies.

WILLOW
(Salix spp.): This had been used as an incense for the purpose of vengeance.

WINTERGREEN
(Gaultheria procumbens): Some young ladies used this in a bath for 1) health and 2) good luck. They might also have a seamstress conceal some leaves inside her petticoats.

WISTERIA
(Wistaria frutescens): Old dark women of the gypsy type who read cards and tea leaves in dimly lit rooms would wash their hands in this before working for good luck and a successful reading.

WITCH HAZEL / TOBACCO WOOD
(Hamamelis virginiana, Nicotiana sylvestris): One burned this with salt beside a purple candle for seven days for legal situations.

WOODRUFF / MASTER OF THE WOOD
(Asperula odorata): A roue might have carried this 1) for winning when playing games of dice, and 2) for the successful control of his lady friends.

WORMWOOD
(Artemisia absinthium): When revenge was called for, the beleagered might try to get some of this on the miscreant bully-boy, or at least in his path, to give him misfortune.

YARROW / MILFOIL
(Achillea millefolium): To chase away fears, some people were advised to put this in a yellow cloth with a list of the problems that needed to be resolved.

YERBA MATE / PARAGUAY TEA
(Ilex paraguariensis): Certain ladies would, to keep their lover faithful, blend a pinch of this with some chile powder in his food daily.

YERBA SANTA
(Eriodictyon californicum): It was said that ladies used this to retain their physical beauty.

YLANG-YLANG
(Cananga odorata): This had been used as an oil for attraction, attention, and to help people to remember one.

YUCCA
(Yucca spp./Manihot ultissima): Ladies were privately advised to massage their face and hands with a fresh piece each of 7 consecutive days for good luck and good skin.

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